FRIDAY FOTO: MEXICAN BUTTERFLY WEED AND MONARCH


We planted three Mexican Butterfly Weed plants in the backyard and babied and watered them through the hot dry summer. This week we saw our first Monarch butterfly visit. I hope we have more stop by on their journey south to Mexico this fall and again in the spring when they head north.

Photo by Husband

Photo by Husband

39 thoughts on “FRIDAY FOTO: MEXICAN BUTTERFLY WEED AND MONARCH

  1. In the past week, I’ve started seeing Monarchs at work. They often scoot across Clear Lake and Galveston Bay. I’m not sure if they’re on the same flight path as yours. I know they’re sometimes seen in large groups in Chambers County, and down in Palacios. Good for you, for providing a little ‘road food’!

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    • It is good to see them anywhere. We usually just see a few passing through but hope these plants encourage them. I have never seen them in large groups in Texas. One fall when I was in Mexico I saw them thick way out from towns. Really beautiful. I hope they like our road food.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, he was lucky to catch it – almost as difficult as the hummers. We try to do what we can and keep a birdbath for the birds and squirrels that visit. After some of the heavy rain we had a Blue Land Crab visit. By the way, I am having some trouble liking and commenting again. Hit and miss with no rhyme or reason. TGIF to you, John.

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  2. How wonderful! I love monarch butterflies but I’ve only seen the rare one in our garden. Lots of cabbage butterflies though. I recall going to the Pacific Grove in California when they were migrating south. There were thousands upon thousands. Such a sight. Every one is a feast for the eyes.

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  3. Jo Nell, you truly have started a butterfly garden – one exclusively for the endangered Monarch butterfly. I have never seen a Monarch here in British Columbia, but I live in hope. We planted half the garden with wild flowers that attracted butterflies, bees and hummingbirds. The garden was literally a beehive of activity and has given us great delight. But no Monarchs. The Mexican butterfly weed does not flourish this far North and that is their only source of food ( love those caterpillars) . Happy gardening dear friend. XXX Virginia

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    • Yes, it is a start. We don’t have the best soil and have to contend with heat and droughts. But we do what we can where we are. The caterpillars are beautiful too. Your gardening results are inspiring when write and share photos of them.

      Recently we have had rain and the temps are cooling down some, low 90s and high 80s – fall for us – so I am encouraged. Take care and happy fall!

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    • Well, it is a small start. Husband has an idea for a larger space with a raised bed for wildflowers maybe for next year. Your posts about your garden and photos are always inspiring, Virginia! You do your part for butterflies, bees and hummers! I look forward to see what you have for the fall. Hugs!

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  4. Bravo on your success, Jo Nell! I planted some milkweed in my front garden, but they didn’t grow. Then the next year, I added a layer of soil to my old garden in the spring and the milkweed started growing. They are only a few plants. Maybe not enough to attract Monarchs to lay eggs, but I feel like I’m trying to help them, anyway.

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    • And bravo for your efforts and for the milkweeds coming back. They are very hardy and will come back after the caterpillars strip them of leaves. We only have three so it doesn’t take much to attract them when they are hungry or want to lay eggs. Yes, we do what we can to help. And you do so much to help the environment and educate. Have a good weekend!

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    • Yes, it was worth it and there have been more Monarch visitors, one at a time usually. It is sometimes hard to tell which is a Monarch as there are a couple so similar. The Monarchs will have three dots and you have to look close. Thanks for your visit!

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  5. Considering that monarch populations have declined, every monarch-friendly plant and each opportunity demonstrate how easy it is to do our part are important! I read and reviewed a book called Bicycling with Butterflies. The author undertook to follow their migration route from Mexico north and back again, educating people in planned programs and on the road. Thank you for doing your part!

    Thank you, as well, for liking my post.

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    • Yes, we do what we can. Since i posted this we had new milkweed plants come up behind these from seeds from the original three. So far they are about 2-4 inches tall. So excited to find them! We may have a butterfly garden after all. Thanks for mentioning the book – may have to check it out. And thanks for the visit and comments.

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