LUNCH AT LA CUEVA


Portland, Texas is not funky, cool or artsy like Port Aransas or even Rockport; it used to be a quiet bedroom community to Corpus Christi where many of us commuted ten miles to work there. Community life revolved around schools, sports and churches. The few small restaurants could not sell alcoholic drinks, and if you wanted to buy liquor, you had to make a run to Jessie’s Liquor in Gregory, a tiny town five miles away. There was no public art.

Today industries,some international, have taken advantage of our location on the Gulf of Mexico and our connections to the Port of Corpus Christi. Industries brought jobs and growth. Chain restaurants have opened and one can enjoy an alcoholic drink with dinner and purchase liquor at one of three liquor stores. With good schools it is still a good place to raise a family. There is still no public art other than a memorial tribute to the military and veterans at city hall.

When an art gallery that serves lunch opened up recently, I persuaded Husband to check it out with me. I keep telling him we need more art in Portland.

La Cueva (the cave in Spanish) is owned and run by Gilbert Cuevas, who is also the artist in residence. He moved to Portland from San Antonio after a successful career in graphic advertising. Growing up in the west side in the barrios, he painted what he saw around him.

The ambiance of La Cueva is unexpected for Portland: intimate dining area, dark wood, tall columns, small bar, sophisticated, elegant yet relaxed and casually classy. His paintings – for sale – are displayed gallery style. A curved staircase leads to more art upstairs. The facility is available for private events. The menu offered salads and sandwiches; wine was available. We had The Cubano – deliciosa!

For a look at some of the art of Gilbert Cuevas and his art, go to La Cueva Art Gallary.

Reproductions of some of his original art was available in postcard form. Here is one of several I purchased to share.

PERSONAL NOTICE TO BLOGGERS


I AM HAVING TROUBLE LIKING AND COMMENTING ON BLOGS!!!! IT SEEMS RANDOM AS SOMETIMES I CAN LIKE AND COMMENT AND SOMETIMES I CAN’T. I NORMALLY LIKE AND /OR COMMENT, BUT DON’T ALWAYS GO BACK TO SEE If THEY APPEARED, JUST TOOK IT FOR GRANTED. SO FAR I AM WORKING WITH WORD PRESS BUT THEY WANT MORE INFORMATION.

FORTUNATELY, I HAVE NO PROBLEM LIKING COMMENTS AND COMMENTING ON MY OWN POSTS. I WANT MORE THAN THAT. IT IS FRUSTRATING! HAS ANYONE HAD SIMILAR PROBLEM? AT THIS POINT I HAVE LITTLE PATIENCE!!!!!!

POST CARD FROM BRIAR COTTAGE 8/11/22


The Old Farmer’s Almanac tells me Dog Days are between July 3 and August 11 as those are normally the hottest days of summer. This year it was hard to tell one hot day from another as the weather week after week was HOT, HOT and more HOT and not even a tropical storm to bring some rain.
We are in Stage I water restrictions that means no watering with sprinklers except on trash day once a week and other limited use of water. Our lawn is brown but we weren’t watering before the restrictions.
I remember the drought during the 1950s when my father, a rancher in South Texas, considered contributing money to seed clouds if praying for rain didn’t work. My mother discouraged that idea and kept praying. Let us hope that it does not take a hurricane to bring rain and get some water into our watershed.

Until then I will keep toasting Chac,the Mayan Rain God.

PRAYER FOR SUMMER SOLSTICE


I greet this morning of sunshine with open eyes
I see the flowers that greet the sun
I hear the birds call to each other from tree to tree
I sense the trees greeting the sun with me
I ask that today bring gladness and gifts
This summer solstice
Warmth of sun
Clearness of air
Happiness of birds
Purity of flowers
Greeness of plants
Prisms in water
Clarity of sight
Patience of growth
Blessings of the long day
May the gifts of this day surround me and all I love
From morning’s first light
Through the shortness of night.
(Author unknown)

REMEMBERING ONE OF MANY ON THIS MEMORIAL DAY


TROY E. KEITH
TEXAS
PFC 311 INF 78 DIV
WWII
MARCH 25 1926 APRIL 12 1945

Troy Elijah Keith was killed in Voilersheim, Germany at 19 years old. He was my first cousin on my father’s side of the family. His mother died a few days after he was born. I was too young to have remembered seeing him, but I do remember being there with my family when his body was brought back from Europe after the war. His body arrived on a train and was given a military burial at Cleveland Memorial Cemetery in Cleveland, Texas, a small town north of Houston. I have not been able to find a photograph of him.